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September 1, 2016 Ecotech Gallery No Comments

6 Degrees to Global Warming

 

WHAT IS 6 DEGREES TO GLOBAL WARMING

The average temperature on Earth is about 61 degrees F (16 C). But temperatures vary greatly around the world depending on the time of year, ocean and wind currents and weather conditions. Summers tend to be warmer and winters colder. Also, temperatures tend to be higher near the equator and lower near the poles.

WHAT HAPPENDED IF THE EARTH TEMPERATURE INCREASE DEGREE BY DEGREE?

  • +1°C

    Arctic circles will emerge in ice-free state within six months

  • +2°C

    Extinction of coral reef and global sea level rising to about seven meters high

  • +3°C

    The gradual disappearance of the Amazon rainforest; ten to hundred of millions of climate refugees migrating to the subtropical latitudes

  • +4°C

    Sea level rising and flooding coastal cities; glaciers disappearing and causing the disintegration of Antarctica

  • +5°C

    The ice caps in North and South pole will melt completely, mass extinction of marine species and massive tsunami will devastate the land

  • +6°C

    Vast volcano eruption, tsunami consumes the land, ozone layer breaking down causing spread of diseases and mass extinction of all life on Earth

 

HOW 6 DEGREES TO GLOBAL WARMING AFFECTS US

Global climate change will affect people and the environment in many ways. Some of these impacts, like stronger hurricanes and severe heat waves, could be life threatening. Others, like spreading weeds, will be less serious. And some effects, like longer growing seasons for crops, might even be good! However, as the Earth keeps getting warmer, the negative effects are expected to outweigh the positive ones.

From agriculture to infrastructure to how humans consume energy, the National Climate Assesssment Development Advisory Committee spotlights how a warming world may bring widespread disruption.

Farmers will see declines in some crops, while others will reap increased yields.

Won’t more atmospheric carbon mean longer growing seasons? Not quite. Over the next several decades, the yield of virtually every crop in California’s fertile Central Valley, from corn to wheat to rice and cotton, will drop by up to 30 percent, researchers expect.

Lackluster pollination, driven by declines in bees due partly to the changing climate, is one reson. Government scientists also expects the warmer climates to shorten the length of the frosting season necessary for many crops to grow in the spring.

Aside from yields, climate change will also affect food processing, storage, and transportation – industries that require an increasing amount of expensive water and energy as global demand rises – leading to higher food prices.

 

WHAT CAN WE DO

Nations around the world are upping their game in the fight against climate change. At the Paris climate summit in 2015, 195 countries signed a historic agreement to reduce their carbon emissions, with the goal of limitting future warming to well below the 2 degree Celsius.

It was a big step in the right direction. But it’s important to remember the equally vital contributions that can be made by private citizens – which is to say, by you. Here’s what you can do:

  • Plant native, drought-resistant trees and shrubs around your home and outdoor air conditioning unit.
  • Replace your current home appliances (refrigerator, washing machine, dish washer) with high-efficiency models.
  • Buy food and other products with reusable or recyclable packaging instead of those in non-recyclable packaging.
  • Replace incandescent light bulbs with compact fluorescent bulbs.
  • Recycle your home’s waste newsprint, cardboard, glass and metal.
  • Leave your car at home (walk, bike or take mass transit instead).
  • Insulate your home, clean the air conditioning filters and install energy efficient showerheads.
  • Purchase a fuel-efficient car (rated at 32 mpg or more) to replace your most frequently used automobile.

 

SOURCES

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